Burning oil issue in/excessive blow by

JayG335

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Apr 6, 2018
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So my stock turbskis blew a few months back, I replaced with VTT stage 2, which I'm absolutely loving. Car pulls great, sounds amazing, just one hiccup. Every single time I roll into full boost I get this lovely burning oil smell from my vents, more noticable with the windows down. I was worried it was the turbos so i had a friend follow me in his STI, I needed someone that could keep up but stay behind. Unfortunately the STI didn't do a very good job at keeping up but he managed to get a decent video I'll upload. I'm getting a bit of white smoke out the back AFTER I pull, on decel. Small amount. I'm curious as to what it could be. I have the RBturbo PCV upgraded replacement and a mishimoto occ. The occ normally collects almost nothing between oil changes. I've put 3k miles on the car since putting it back together and haven't gotten a low oil warning yet but the smell is annoying and worrisome. I hope im not over pressurizing the crank case. The VCG was done 15k miles ago and does NOT appear to be leaking anywhere. Im getting a slight build up of residue on the back corner but I wouldn't call it a leak. I think it's time I look into the RB full kit but don't want to go chasing the wrong thing. Any input is greatly appreciated. thanks guys
 

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So you currently have the high load side Mishimoto setup? If correct we would suggest removing it and simply put back on the OE vent hose to the rear inlet for the time being.

Thereafter you may also want to compression test and/or better yet leak down your engine to ensure it has a clean bill of health (post results if you already have them).

On another note if you do eventually move to the RB External PCV you can use your Mishimoto OCC on the low load side, but that style of OCC was NOT designed for high flow as you need on the ventilation high load side of the PCV system.

Rob
 

The Convert

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Smoke on develop after a pull is typically valve stem seals. Oil smell could be from an inadequate pcv setup or cracked VC.
 

JayG335

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Forgive my ignorance on pcv setup but I'm unfamiliar with what is high side and what is low side. My set up is as pictured. Please inform me of a proper set up and I'll happily correct it immediately. Thank you!
 

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The Convert

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The "high" side comes from the back passenger side of the valve cover through the flapper valve and into the rear turbo inlet. The "low" side comes from the back driver's side of the valve cover through a pcv valve and back into the valve cover, through the cyclonic separators, and then enters the intake ports on the head through small ports in the top of each of the intake ports.The high side is open and in use during on boost driving, and the low side during typical cruise/off boost driving. The low side is the side that does the vast majority of intake port gunking. Right now, the best setup, imo, is the VTT dual catch can, rb external low side kit, block the intake pcv low side ports in the head, and then choose your own lines and fittings so that you still have the high side connected to the rear turbo, but routed through the high side catch can. That will be the most 1:1 to stock functionality, but while preventing every bit of pcv gunk getting in your intake ports and rear turbo inlet.
 

fmorelli

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The "high" side comes from the back passenger side of the valve cover through the flapper valve and into the rear turbo inlet. The "low" side comes from the back driver's side of the valve cover through a pcv valve and back into the valve cover, through the cyclonic separators, and then enters the intake ports on the head through small ports in the top of each of the intake ports.The high side is open and in use during on boost driving, and the low side during typical cruise/off boost driving. The low side is the side that does the vast majority of intake port gunking. Right now, the best setup, imo, is the VTT dual catch can, rb external low side kit, block the intake pcv low side ports in the head, and then choose your own lines and fittings so that you still have the high side connected to the rear turbo, but routed through the high side catch can. That will be the most 1:1 to stock functionality, but while preventing every bit of pcv gunk getting in your intake ports and rear turbo inlet.
Cripes ... someone finally summarized this without paragraphs and paragraphs of show up and throw up. Congrats!

Filippo
 
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The "high" side comes from the back passenger side of the valve cover through the flapper valve and into the rear turbo inlet. The "low" side comes from the back driver's side of the valve cover through a pcv valve and back into the valve cover, through the cyclonic separators, and then enters the intake ports on the head through small ports in the top of each of the intake ports.The high side is open and in use during on boost driving, and the low side during typical cruise/off boost driving. The low side is the side that does the vast majority of intake port gunking. Right now, the best setup, imo, is the VTT dual catch can, rb external low side kit, block the intake pcv low side ports in the head, and then choose your own lines and fittings so that you still have the high side connected to the rear turbo, but routed through the high side catch can. That will be the most 1:1 to stock functionality, but while preventing every bit of pcv gunk getting in your intake ports and rear turbo inlet.

Great info and summary.

The only thing worth adding is two things IMO:
1) Both the high and low side pass through the crankcase's cyclonic separators.
2) The high load side needs a very high flow OCC (if you wish to optionally equip) whereas the low load side needs a very finely filtrated OCC (if you wish to optionally equip). Therefore utilizing the same type of OCC (for both sides) is not recommended if you wish for an optimized and efficient setup.

Thanks,
Rob
 

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Forgive my ignorance on pcv setup but I'm unfamiliar with what is high side and what is low side. My set up is as pictured. Please inform me of a proper set up and I'll happily correct it immediately. Thank you!

You have the Mishimoto high side kit designed specific for the N54. In our opinion they really did not fully understand the system when they designed their kit, and thus utilized a more finely filtrated (ie. more restrictive) OCC on the high load side where you need 100% free flowing potential. We would recommend removing this kit and check out other items as per our initial post.
 
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